Historical Look at London Through the English Capital’s Top Attractions


There is no doubt London is still one of the centres of World History in many respects. Through its many historical sites and attractions, it is possible to see why. While there are hundreds of top historical sites in London alone, here are a couple that have been drawing visitors from around the world in droves.

Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace was at first just another Queen’s House prior to its total transformation into a fulsome private palace for Queen Charlotte (1744–1818). The Palace has been developed over the centuries by Queens and Kings as a comfortable residence befitting a royal family. However, it was through the work of the great architect, John Nash, that Buckingham was modified into what it is today. By 1837, Queen Victoria ascended the throne and the Palace was transformed into a principal residence for the Royal Family it is famous for today.

Buckingham Palace

London Bridge

The current site where the London Bridge can be seen is a 1973 construction made of concrete and steel to form a box girder kind of bridge. However, the box girder replaced a stone arched bridge constructed in the nineteenth century to replace another old bridge created in the sixth century during the medieval times. Likewise, the medieval structure of the London Bridge was also replacing another timber bridge created by the Romans.

London Bridge

Kensington Palace

Mary II of England realized her joint sovereign, William III of England, was asthmatic and Kensington Palace was bought for 20,000 pounds from Daniel Finch in 1619 to be their residence. Christopher Wren, the Surveyor of King’s Work at the time was commissioned to expand the Palace so that both the attendants and sovereigns could be accommodated. Queen Mary had the Queen’s Gallery built, including a reconstruction of the King’s Staircase.

By 1704, Queen Anne took residence of Kensington Palace and extended the work of William and Mary through Christopher Wren who had done the earlier expansions. George I in 1722 also added fresh and lavish state rooms, namely the Privy Chamber, Withdrawing Room and the Cupola Room. As the 2nd World War took its toll, Kensington Palace was also affected and it had to be rebuilt by Queen Elizabeth II before her Diamond Jubilee for 12 million pounds in 2012.

Tower of London

Officially “Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress”, the Tower of London is a historical Central London castle along the north bank of the River Thames. It was built in 1066 A.D. immediately following the Norman Conquest of England, named after the White Tower of 1078 constructed by William the Conqueror. The Tower of London hosts the Crown Jewels of the Royal Collection within the Jewel House, guarded by Beefeater or the Yeoman Warders.

Houses of Parliament

The House of Parliament is well spread upon the Middle-sex bank of the River Thames within the larger Palace of Westminster and holds the House of Commons and the House of Lords. Westminster Hall in contrast with other Palace of Westminster historical constructions is the oldest, constructed around 1097. The Big Ben (Elizabeth Tower) is towards Westminster Palace’s north end and rises to a height of 96 metres or 316 feet.

London Eye

River Thames’ south bank holds the giant Ferris wheel popularly recognised as the Millennium Wheel or the London Eye. Since January 2011, the structure has been known as the EDF Energy London Eye. At a diameter of 120 meters, the 1999 creation is Europe’s highest Ferris Wheel at 135 meters.

London Eye

Fen Court’s Slavery Memorial

Around Fen Court is the first slave victims’ memorial ever built in London known as the Gilt of Cain, erected with the support of City of London in 2007. It is the design work of Lemn Sissay and Michael Visocchi.

Guildhall

Every civic government today draws its model from the Guildhall, located in the City of London. Guildhall’s history is long but the first time it was documented as Guildhall was in 1128. For hundreds of years, the building has been the city’s town hall, including maintaining the ceremonial and administrative centre of the City of London.

Wimbledon-England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club

It is the only location where all Wimbledon Championships occur. All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club or the (AELTC) is located in the capital’s Church Road. As a private member’s club, AELTC is famous for its Grand Slam on grass and was developed on the 23rd of July in 1868, at a time when England was crazed by croquet.

V&A Museum

Apart from being the largest arts and decorative design museum of its kind around the globe, Victoria and Albert Museum is the home of permanent collections totalling 4.5 million. It was developed in 1852 and named after Prince Albert and his wife Queen Victoria. Spread across 12.5 acres, V&A Museum houses 145 galleries with 5,000 years of art collections collected from diverse cultures around the world, both contemporary and ancient art.

An apt accommodation, one that takes you closer to the spirit of the city, is essential to your experience! London certainly has no paucity of choice. The rich historic splendour and old world charm of this city drenched in history is reflected at its best in a wide range of serviced apartments offered.  London Bridge, a bustling and historic area in the heart of the city stretches from London Bridge to pass Tower Bridge on both sides of the iconic river Thames. One of the best places to base your stay in London, it houses some of the best serviced apartments. Featuring a fully furnished kitchen, lounge, terrace and even a balcony, the apartments come with all the modern comforts and conveniences. A stay in this area means you are just a short walk from trendy cafes, exciting bars and everything that exudes the unique London vibe.

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